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Shavout is a two day festival (one in Israel) it is to celebrate the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai. Shavuot falls on the fiftieth day after the beginning of Passover.

 

Shavout happens on

 

May 17 & 18, 2002 6 & 7 Sivan 5762

June 6 & 7,  2003 6 & 7 Sivan 5763

May 26 & 27,  2004 6 & 7 Sivan 5764

 

Shavuot - Traditions 

 

Shavuot is celebrated seven weeks and one day after Passover. Shavuot is a one day celebration in Israel and two days in the Diaspora (outside of Israel).

 

Shavuot is known by other names, including:

 

Chag HaShavuot

(The Feast of Weeks)

 

Chag HaBikurim

(The Festival of First Fruits)

 

Chag HaKatzir

(The Harvest Festival)

 

The night before Shavuot is dedicated to the study of the Torah. This tradition is let HaShem know that we want to study his Torah and we start at sundown beginning Shavuot and many study throughout the night showing their dedication.

Shavuot is 50 days after Passover (the 6th of Sivan) and the word Shavuot means "weeks" because it is 7 weeks after Passover.

The Torah tells us that we celebrate this holiday because of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai. In Exodus chapter 19 and 20 we are told that HaShem gave us the commandments.

Today Shavuot is celebrated in synagogues  around the world by reading the Book of Ruth and a very beautiful poem called Akdamut.

Many synagogues have their religious schools participate in a Bikkurim festival. The children march around holding baskets of fruit which are placed on the pulpit and later donated to hospitals or the poor. This is to remind us that Shavuot is one of the three pilgrimage holidays when in Ancient times Jews brought their first fruits to the Temple as an offering to HaShem. The first fruits were called Bikkurim.

 

Shavout - Ten Commandments     

 

I am the Lord, your God

 

You shall have no other gods before me.

 

You shall not take the name of the L-rd in vain.

 

Remember the Shabbat and keep it holy.

 

Honor your father and mother.

 

You shall not kill.

 

You shall not be unfaithful to your wife or husband.

 

You shall not steal.

 

You shall not bear false witness.

 

You shall not desire what is your neighbor's.

 

 

 

Blintzes Casserole

 

This is from an email pal, Miriam VanRaalte, who noted, "I got this

from a Temple member (Alyse Kirschen) a few years ago. It's fantastic,

only dirties 2 bowls, a measuring cup, and measuring spoon. Is much

cheaper than blintzes, but tastes just like them. Easy, quick, cheap,

delicious..." [BTW, it also can be adapted for Pesah, by substituting for

the flour and baking powder.]

 

Blintzes Casserole

 

FOR LAYERS ONE AND THREE:

6 eggs

1 1/2 cups sour cream

1/2 cup orange juice

1/3 cup sugar

1/2 margarine, melted

1 cup flour

2 tsp. baking powder

 

 

FOR LAYER TWO:

8 oz. softened cream cheese

1 egg

1 pint cottage cheese

1 tbsp. sugar

1 tsp. vanilla

 

Beat each mixture in a bowl.  Pour half of top mixture into greased 9x13

baking dish.  Spoon bottom mixture on and top with remaining batter from

top.  Bake 45-55 minutes at 350 degrees.  Serve w/ sour cream or fruit (I

use pie filling).

 

 

CHEESECAKE IN A WALNUT CRUS

Serves 8-10

Keeps 4 days in the fridge.

Freezes 3 months.

 

For the crust

3 oz. (75 g) caster [superfine] sugar

4 oz. (125 g) firm butter or margarine

5 oz. (150 g) plain flour

3 oz. (75 g) walnut halves

 

For the filling

8 oz. (225 g) cream cheese

8 oz. (225 g) curd cheese

4 oz. (125 g) butter or reduced-fat spread

3 oz. (75 g) caster sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

5 fl oz. (125 ml) soured cream or Greek yoghurt

grated rind of 1 large lemon

2 eggs

2 oz. (50 g) raisins

 

Preheat the oven to gas no. 7 (425 F, 220 C).

 

Lightly oil the inside of an 8 or 8-1/2 -inch (20-22 cm) loose-bottomed flan tin

at least 1-1/2 inches (4 cms) deep.

 

To make the crust: cut the fat into roughly 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks and put in

the food processor with the sugar, then pulse until combined. Add the flour and

pulse until crumbly.

 

Add the walnuts and process until the mixture is the consistency of coarse sand.

 

With the fingers, press into the bottom and sides of the prepared tin.

 

To make the filling: in an electric mixer (or by hand), beat together the fat,

sugar, vanilla and the cheese. Add all the remaining ingredients and beat until

smooth. Spoon into the unbaked crust.

 

Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce the heat to gas no. 4 (350 F, 180 C) and bake

for a further 20-30 minutes or until the edges are golden and the surface

lightly set.

 

Remove to a cooling tray and leave for 20 minutes.

 

Go round the edges of the crust with a sharp knife to loosen it, then remove the

side of the tin.

 

Serve warm, at room temperature, or preferably well chilled.

 

 

 

Dumplings, Fruit-Filled

 

3 c Pitted sour cherries (or blueberries)

3/4 c Sugar

2 ts Lemon juice

1 tb Cornstarch

1 tb Cold water

Homemade noodles; * see note

1 c Sour cream

 

Note:  the recipe for "Homemade Noodles" is not included

 

Save any juice that oozes from the cherries (if cherries are

used). Combine the fruit and juice, sugar and lemon juice in

a saucepan. Mix cornstarch and water and add. Cook over low

heat 10 minutes, stirring frequently.  Drain, reserving syrup.

 

Make the noodle dough and roll it out but do not let it dry.

 

Cut into 3-inch circles.  Place a tablespoon of the fruit on

each. Fold over into half-moons and press edges together with

a little water.

 

Cook in rapidly boiling salted water for 10 minutes or until

varenikis rise to the top.  Drain. 

 

Serve with the syrup and garnish with sour cream.

 

Makes about 24.

 

 

Pancakes, Feta-Stuffed

 

Shavuoth is that holiday when dairy foods are uppermost in the minds of

Kurdistan housewives. Here is one example, prepared with a yeast dough and

stuffed with feta cheese.

 

 1 pkg. dry yeast (1/4 oz.)

 2 cups warm water

 6 cups flour

 1/4 tsp. salt

 1 tbsp. corn oil

 3-4 tbsp. margarine

 1 lb. feta cheese, grated or chopped

 

1. Mix the yeast in 1/2 cup of the water and let it proof for 10 minutes.

 

2. Make a well in the flour, add the yeast mixture, salt and oil and mix all

together, using enough of the balance of the water to form a soft, moist

dough. Knead the dough for 5 minutes, dusting with flour now and then.

 

3. Take 1/2 cup of the dough and roll it out into a pancake 8 inches in

diameter and about 1/4 inch thick. Rub the pancake with about 1/2 teaspoon of

margarine and sprinkle over the lower half 2 generous tablespoons of the feta

cheese. Moisten the bottom edge of the pancake with water and fold over to

shape a half-moon. Pinch the edges together and press down firmly with the

tines of a fork, or turn over the edge every 1/2 inch in a twisting movement.

 

4 Melt 1 teaspoon margarine in a skillet and brown both sides of the pancake

over moderate heat for about 3 minutes.

 

Serve warm. Makes from 18 to 20 pancakes.

 

 

 

 

Soup, Vegetable  Mediterranean 

 

Serves from 8 to 10

 

A touch of ginger adds a lot to this soup.

 

2 Tablespoons olive oil

2 medium carrots, peeled and chopped into small pieces

1 large onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, crushed

2 Tablespoons grated fresh ginger

2 medium potatoes, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch cubes

4 medium tomatoes, chopped

1 cup finely chopped coriander leaves

7 cups water

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon cumin

 

Heat oil in a saucepan; then stir-fry carrots, onion, garlic, and ginger

over medium heat for 8 minutes. Add potatoes, tomatoes, and coriander leaves

and stir-fry for another 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients a nd bring to

boil. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat for 1 hour or until vegetables

are well-done.

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